SESSIONS


Monday, May 13 – Professional Development Day

 

Concurrent 1.1: Innovation Procurement: an outcome-based approach to delivery value  All Day Workshop

Innovation procurement is a strategic enabler, focused on improving patient outcomes and increasing efficiency to the system while delivering value for money. This session is designed to provide you with the necessary skills to manage innovation procurement initiatives, using the HSCN Innovation Procurement Toolkit as a framework. Working with other healthcare procurement specialists in a stimulating learning environment that combines lecture style delivery with hands-on skills labs, you will learn to develop early market engagement strategies, outcome-based specifications and value-based evaluation criteria. Don’t miss this opportunity to build the confidence to apply these concepts immediately and deliver organizational value through innovation procurement initiatives.

 

Sarah Friesen, Friesen Concepts Inc.

Iris Ko, Professor , Georgian College

Concurrent 1.2: How to design and optimise your RFP Operating Model with KPI's   Morning Workshop

This workshop provides you with practical KPI's to enhance your RFP design, drafting and assembly, negotiations and execution of agreement.  It will be delivered through simulation.  The aim is to bring together suppliers and providers perspectives to learn from each other's perspectives in the beginning and end stages of a competitive procurement process.

 

Benefits for suppliers attending include insight into client decision-making, client strategies and client evaluation factors.

 

There will be interactive, client-focused simulations pertaining to: 


- Complexity Matrix
- Project Charter Development
- Negotiated RFP Template Selection
- Human Factors Questions for RFP Evaluations
- Striking a deal

 

Kara LeBlanc, Category Manager, Strategic Procurement Health Services, Service New Brunswick

Concurrent 1.3: Delivering Value with Reverse Auctions: A Workshop for Buyers and Suppliers  Afternoon Workshop

This session is designed for both buyers and suppliers who have a keen interest in reverse auction techniques and strategies.  While reverse auctions are more widely used in the private sector, there are many opportunities for this unique procurement method to be utilized in Health Care, within the RFP framework.  Participants will engage in an overview of the different styles of online auctions, current platforms and resources available.  We will also share recent experiences from previously run auctions, as well as facilitate open discussion between buyers and suppliers, on potential pitfalls and value added benefits.  Attendees are encouraged to contribute to the discussion on their lived experiences and perceptions.
 
Participants will also take part in small working groups which will develop, build, and run a live auction, taking into account multiple factors from information gained throughout the session. 
 

Dale Wernham, Manager Strategic Sourcing, Healthcare Materials Management Services (HMMS)

Tuesday, May 14 – HSCN Annual Conference Day 1

 

Opening Keynote -  Dr. Randy Bradley - The Future of Supply Chain Integration - Digitalized Health Care Supply Chain

Supply chain professionals clearly see a tsunami of new technology coming at them and are scrambling to develop a strategy to deal with it. IT is absolutely critical in the supply chain because of its potential to facilitate the nexus of cost, quality, and outcomes in healthcare. The increasing need and desire to have access to the right information, at the right time, and in the right context from anywhere to promote responsiveness of care and service delivery are predicated seamless information flows in the supply chain. As such, IT capabilities that can promote a seamless exchange of information are crucial for effective and timely responses to changes in both internal and external customers and supplier demands. Therein lies the value and potential of an always-on digital supply chain.

 

The “digital supply chain” is a phrase that is all too common today. Most consulting firms and vendors have their own take on what it means and what it will or should look like. Despite the various opinions surrounding the concept, few doubt that it’s a real thing. There are even some common positions and understandings of what serves as the underpinnings of the digital supply chain. So in this digital era, the always-on digital supply chain is augmented by several categories of advanced and emerging technologies, innovations, and advancements that will continue to shape the digital supply chain in the future, namely are: cloud computing and storage, sensors and auto identification technologies, robotics and automation, auto identification technologies, robotics and automation, predictive analytics, wearables and mobile technology, and drones and autonomous vehicles. 

 

In his session, Dr Bradley will present data that illustrates the rate of adoption of these technologies in the supply chain and discuss their potential to help reimagine the healthcare and the healthcare supply chain. Further, he will explain why and how the supply chain function can and should be the seat of innovation in healthcare organizations to help drive towards digitalization of the supply chain in a manner that drives value and not solely cost efficiency.

 

Dr. Randy Bradley, Assistant Professor, Haslam College of Business, The University of Tennessee

Sponsored & Introduced by HealthPRO

Concurrent Session 2.1 - Hello from the Other Side: Engaging clinical stakeholders in the (innovation) procurement process

Stakeholder involvement in the procurement process is critical to a successful outcome for both the procuring organization and the vendor partner.

 

Building on the Conference Board of Canada’s report “Balancing Effectiveness and Efficiency: Driving value-based health care through clinician engagement”, as well as the learned experience of those outside of the procurement space, this presentation will give a frank and open look at the procurement process from those clinical stakeholders who are so critical to an effective procurement.

 

Through participating in the session, participants will obtain:

  • -   Understanding of strategies to create more value in the procurement process itself, driving to more valuable solutions that better match the needs of the

  •     providers.

  • -   Gather ideas about how to innovate the procurement process to match stakeholder needs.

  • -   Simple tools and techniques to better understand the needs of the clinical stakeholder.

  • -   Simple tools and techniques to understand the different priorities of the supply chain professional and the clinical stakeholder, using each other's time wisely.

  • -   How to incorporate methods of stakeholder engagement into day to day thinking in procurements both large and small.

 

Kyle Shafer, Change Management, Innovation & Partnerships, CIPO, Transform SSO

Ray Meyer, Perioperative Clinical Manager, Bluewater Health

Kim Kraeft, Performance and Transformation, Bluewater Health

Concurrent Session 2.2 - HSCN Think Tank

HSCN's Value Proposition offers networking opportunities and a "launching pad" for member (provider and supplier) concerns.  The Think Tank is designed to provide opportunity for Suppliers and Providers to come together in a safe environment to raise concerns and to determine the issues that are a priority for change.

 

Toby O'Hara Board Co-chair, HSCN

David Donnelly, Board Co-chair, HSCN

Concurrent Session 2.3 - Value-based Procurement: New Brunswick's Pediatric Insulin Pump Program

As the interest in Value-Based Healthcare and patient focused initiatives continue to develop across Canada and globally, there are rapid developments and pilot projects occurring across the country. New Brunswick, for example, is engaged and advancing the development of value-based procurement as a driver to achieving value-based healthcare.
 
The topic proposed is Service New Brunswick's competitive procurement initiative to obtain fair and affordable access to a range of insulin pump devices and supplies for New Brunswick children with Type 1 diabetes and their family. It was a patient-focused initiative resulting in multi-source awards, and provides choice for patients.
 
The audience will learn:
  • -   Critical elements toward a successful competitive procurement process.
  • -   The importance of collaboration for optimal outcomes.
  • -   How a value-based approach supports the need of patients and their families.
  •  

Kara LeBlanc, Strategic Procurement, Service New Brunswick

Concurrent Session 2.4 - An innovative path to transformational clinical operations: outcomes-based procurement for deep infrastructure retrofits

Unlike the traditional “procure for equipment approach,” an outcomes-based, design-and implementation procurement approach for deep infrastructure retrofits presents an opportunity to seek innovative solutions from the marketplace that address multiple pain points at once.

 

This presentation will feature the journey of the Quebec City University Hospital Network, which underwent tremendous infrastructure enhancements at its four hospitals. Outcomes included significant overall reductions of: 30% in energy, 29% in utility bills ($2,734,499 annually), and 56% in GHG emissions. Widely recognized by its peers, the project earned the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society’s 2017 Wayne McLellan Award of Excellence, a 2017 ASHRAE Technology Award honourable mention, and a 2017 Energia Award for integrated energy management.

 

Patrick Ouellet Assistant Director of Technical Services, CHU de Québec – Université Laval
Frédérick Leonard, Project Director, Ecosystem Energy Services

Putting the "AI" in Healthcare Supply Chains: Understanding how AI will impact healthcare procurement and create value for patients and hospitals

The focus of this presentation will be three-fold: (1) to introduce the major types of AI technology (machine learning, NLP, robotics, etc.) and the value they bring to the healthcare industry, (2) to examine specific AI applications and case studies within healthcare procurement, and (3) to outline critical criteria to consider when procuring AI moving forward.

 

The audience will learn to:

  • -    Understand the major types of AI and their applications within healthcare.

  • -    Understand the barriers and enablers of AI in both healthcare and healthcare procurement.

  • -    Integrate AI technology and strategy into the overall business strategy of their organizations.

  • -    Understand the ways in which AI creates value for organizations and for patients.

  • -    Understand the key criteria to consider when evaluating the value of an AI technology.

Karen Belaire, President and CEO, Shared Services West

Anya Todic, Project Manager - Supply Chain Optimization, Shared Services West

Lydia Lee, Partner and National Leader, CIO Advisory Services & Digital Health, KPMG

Where do I begin?  Building a Unique Device Identification (UDI) implementation road map

Learn from a panel of industry providers, suppliers, regulators and supply chain association leaders that are collaborating through UDI adoption.This session will explain the basics of UDI as well as implementation steps: from data gathering, system integration, to point-of-care adoption and benefits.

 

Key discussion points:

 

1.  What is Unique Device Identification (UDI)?

2.  What is International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF)?

3.  The critical link between Cost Quality and Outcomes (CQO) and UDI.

4.  The value of adoption.

5.  Where do I collect my Device Identifier (DI) to get started?

6.  ERP, EPR and Middleware – how it all works, and do I have what is needed.

7.  Industry challenges – too many barcodes and Multiple DI’s – provider and vendor perspectives.

8.  National Evaluation System for Health Technology (NEST)

9.  The audience will take away a global solution perspective on how to begin UDI adoption.

 

Moderator:  Karen Conway, Vice President, Healthcare Value, Global Healthcare Exchange

Panelists:

Michael Schiller, Senior Director Supply Chain, AHRMM

Ted Heise, Vice President, Regulatory and Clinical Services at MED Institute, Cook Medical

Wendy Watson, OR Supply Chain Manager, University Health Network

Nancy Shadeed, Special Advisor International Programs Division, Health Canada

Embracing Small to Think Big and Realize Potential

Denise Lewis FlemingCEO, Health PEI

Shifting perspectives – PEI is small and is proud of its traditions. However, being small is viewed by some as a challenge that can limit options and what can be achieved. It has been nine years since PEI’s single health authority was created; fourteen years since the five regional health authorities were dissolved. Traditions of the former organizations can still be found to this day, including philosophies and perspectives about supply chain impediments to front-line service delivery and buying power limitations.

 

Yet being small has advantages and benefits, if you choose to see and tap into them.  It is possible to be small and mighty in the large Canadian healthcare sector ‘pond’.  Health PEI has chosen to change its mind set and think big.  Over the past seven years, it has developed and fostered relationships with partners, peers and staff, as well as leveraged and grew the foundation that arose from amalgamation in order to capitalize on the benefits of ‘small’.  PEI will share its journey so that others can use its experiences and lessons learned to assist in advancing standards and best practices in their supply chain service delivery that contribute to improving healthcare services while supporting the goal of fiscal sustainability.

Concurrent Session 2.5 - Shining a light on a new supply chain in Ontario

In July of 2016, HMMS and TransForm collaborated on an announcement to enter into a partnership to optimize HMMS’ stockless management. Over the last two years, the two organizations have successfully migrated all of the TransForm’s five hospital organizations (LHIN 1 in Southwestern Ontario) into the supply chain processes with HMMS’ hospital owners and affiliates (15 hospitals in LHIN 2). The results are extremely successful yet highlighted some of the chronic issues plaguing Canada’s healthcare supply chain. Key themes for industry improvement will be highlighted (disparate technologies,sub-optimized sourcing strategies (resource, price and outcome variances), operational readiness for necessary change management) along with examples of some of the innovative strategies HMMS and TransForm used to overcome barriers.

 

Toby O'Hara, GM, HMMS

Derek Robertson, Chief Business Development and Supply Chain Officer, Transform SSO

Concurrent Session 2.6 - From Data to Value - A Client Engagement Journey

PHSA Supply Chain has invested in system design and architecture over the past three years, in order to overcome challenges related to non-centralized and inaccessible data. This presentation will illustrate the Provincial Health Services Authority – Supply Chain (PHSA-SC) technology road map and engagement process. Specifically, it will explore/demonstrate our approach to making data accessible within the organization, the internal tools built to deliver insight to decision makers, and the interactive BI dashboards developed for both internal and external stakeholders.

 

Gustavo Estrada, Director Supply Chain Performance, Provincial Health Services Authority

Kevin Kearns, Director Advanced Solutions, Provincial Health Services Authority

Concurrent Session 2.7 - Supply Chain Transformation - Implementation of a Shared Services Model in Newfoundland and Labrador

The presentation will cover all components of the supply chain transformation in a province faced with extreme geographical and environmental divergences. Discussion will include Governance, strategic sourcing, technology acquisition (and benefits) through to a proactive strategy utilizing cost, quality, and outcomes to move supply chain to the forefront in healthcare. Lessons learned will also be discussed.

 

Discussion will cover:

  • -   The impacts on vendors (e.g. credentialing , compliance reviews,etc.

  • -   Value-based procurement

  • -   Customer service (health care customers) as a key Performance indicator

 

Tony Williams, Provincial Director, Supply Chain, Central Health NF

Tami MacDonald, Provincial Project Lead, Newfoundland & Labrador Provincial Health Shared Services Supply Chain

Concurrent Session 2.8 - Hurricane Maria - Risk Management and Recovery in a Global Supply Chain

This presentation will provide a clear picture of the scope of problems that natural disaster can present in off-shore manufacturing.  Using a case study approach, the detailed review outlines the lessons learned and the mitigating steps that should be taken to avoid similar issues that affect vendors, its suppliers and a broad range of clients.

 

This presentation:

  • -   Establishes awareness and appreciation of the importance and value of contingency planning.

  • -   Identifies and recognizes risk, where risk is not easily distinguished.

  • -   Appreciates the importance of how to work with key stakeholders to reduce bottlenecks and the regulations throughout the industry with a clear goal to

  •     ensure continuity of patient care.

  • -   Emphasizes the importance and value of communication and a strategic focus on outcomes.

 

James Teaff, VP/Business Unit Head of Hospital Products, Baxter Canada

Nicola Raycraft, Strategic Relationship Manager, Baxter Canada

Wednesday, May 15 – HSCN Annual Conference Day 2

 

Welcome - Susan Smith, GM HSCN

Keynote - Heather Flannery

 

 

Heather Flannery, Health Circle Global Lead, ConsenSys; Co-Chair, HIMSS Blockchain Task Force

 

Concurrent Session 3.1 - Innovation in Procurement: A Framework for Creating Value and Mobilizing Supply Chain Transformation

This presentation is focused on unpacking the essential innovation and value-based procurement challenges facing Canada, as well as approaches to successfully overcome these challenges. We will review Plexxus' innovation procurement decision-making approach and discuss how it enables value-based healthcare in Ontario by fostering new approaches to driving value at multiple parts of the healthcare system i.e. patients, providers, hospitals and vendor community. Techniques and strategies such as patient engagement and establishing strong partnerships and collaborations across the broader healthcare sector, supplier landscape and government will be discussed. We will highlight several successful projects where we have applied these techniques such as the provincial value-based procurement initiative of ICD/CRTs on which Plexxus collaborated with CorHealth Ontario and the Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategic/MOHLTC.

 

Participants will be able to articulate the challenging system level barriers to innovation, understand opportunities to modernize our approaches to driving value through practical examples and learn how to build capacity for innovation and strategic partnerships within their organizations.

 

Dov Klein, Vice President, Innovation & Strategic Partnerships, Plexxus

Lauren Bell, Manager of Innovation & Strategic Partnerships, Plexxus

Concurrent Session 3.2 - HSCN Think Tank

HSCN's Value Proposition offers networking opportunities and a "launching pad" for member (Provider and Supplier) concerns.  The Think Tank is designed to provide opportunity for Suppliers and Providers to come together, in a safe environment to raise concerns and to determine the issues that are a priority for change.

 

Toby O-Hara, Board Co-chair, HSCN

David Donnelly, Board Co-chair, HSCN

 

Concurrent Session 3.3 - Risky Business ... Collaboration and Innovation - A Case Study Approach

When we link the supply chain together, new risk exposures result and healthcare organizations need to protect themselves. In this session, we will present real world case studies that identify these new partnership risks, provide mitigation strategies and introduce best practices for organizations to follow. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of three risk areas, and will be able to apply a critical risk management lens to potential risks faced by entering new partnerships.

 

Shahbaz Haque, Brokerage Manager & Deputy Principal Broker, HIROC Insurance Services Ltd.

 

Concurrent Session 3.4 - Freeing up clinical resources from logistics: A partnership story

The presentation will explore the supply chain partnership between 2 major teaching healthcare facilities in Montreal and their logistics service provider. The healthcare facilities will share how they identified and solved challenges by focusing on core competencies. The audience will be provided with insights on the context that was the stepping-stone behind this significant project as well as how the model is set-up. The customer representatives will review the governance of their service model. They will also provide insights to the before and after impact, i.e.the value and continuous improvement through deeper engagement that the program has brought them since its inception five years ago. The objective of the presentation is to provide visibility to the value of the partnership as well as insights to learnings and recommendations for effective deployment of similar approaches in other facilities or geographies.

 

Christine OuelletteProcurement & Logistics Department,  McGill - CHUM (Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal)

Carlo Rossi, Asst. to the Director of Logistics and Procurement,  MUHC (McGill University Health Centre)

Marc Sebastien VerraultDirector, Healthcare Solutions - East,  Cardinal Health Canada

 

Fostering relationships and increasing capacity in Innovation Procurement

The panel will provide insight from a healthcare procurement professional perspective of how to develop meaningful knowledge collaborations to support undertaking an innovation procurement. When building capacity, it is important to involve front-line staff, legal, IT and procurement officers from the outset. Involving all levels of staff that may be affected by the procurement will provide a more transparent and smarter approach to the process.

 

Key takeaways will be examples of Innovation Procurements outlining the importance of fostering collaborations, what worked and how modifications to the strategies and methodologies supported successful procurements. Tania Massa will lead the panel session with four panelists providing a wide-range of perspectives on the importance of developing and maintaining meaningful collaborations to support Innovation Procurement.

 

Moderator: Dr. Tania Massa, Director, Innovation Procurement, Ontario Centres of Excellence

Panelists:

 

Francois Drolet, Director Public Affairs, Roche Diagnostics Canada
Jasmina Germanski, Manager Privacy, Information Security and Health Records, Mackenzie Health
Silvie Crawford, Executive Vice President/Chief Nursing Executive, Kingston Health Sciences Centre

Protecting Canada's Pharmaceutical Supply Chain from Illegal Online Pharmacies

According to the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 96% of online pharmacies are illegal and unsafe. Illegal sites often sell medicines that contain dangerous ingredients, unapproved medicines, medicines that contain the wrong active ingredient or medicines that may contain too much or too little of the active ingredient.  With Canada experiencing an upward trend in e-commerce, concerns arise regarding the impact of illegal online sellers on Canadian patients, and the integrity of Canada’s medical supply chain.

 

The Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacies (ASOP)representative in Canada, Dani Peters will provide an introductory discussion regarding illegal online sellers and its risks to Canada’s medical supply chain. She will be joined by Detective Robert Whalen from the Toronto Police Service, who will address the connection between illegal online sellers and organized crime networks in Canada and around the world.

 

Dani Peters, Principal Advisor, Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacies (ASOP)

Detective Robert Whalen, Toronto Police 55 Division

 

Concurrent Session 3.5 - Hurricane Maria - Risk management and recovery in a global supply chain (REPEAT)

This presentation will provide a clear picture of the scope of problems that natural disaster can present in off-shore manufacturing.  Using a case study approach, the detailed review outlines the lessons learned and the mitigating steps that should be taken to avoid similar issues that affect vendors, its suppliers and a broad range of clients.

 

This presentation:

  • -   Establishes awareness and appreciation of the importance and value of contingency planning.

  • -   Identifies and recognizes risk, where risk is not easily distinguished.

  • -   Appreciates the importance of how to work with key stakeholders to reduce bottlenecks and the regulations throughout the industry with a clear goal to ensure continuity of patient care.

  • -   Emphasizes the importance and value of communication and a strategic focus on outcomes.

 

James Teaff, VP/Business Unit Head of Hospital ProductsBaxter Canada

Nicola Raycraft, Strategic Relationship Manager, Baxter Canada

 

Concurrent Session 3.6 - Shining a light on a new supply chain in Ontario (REPEAT)

In July of 2016, HMMS and TransForm collaborated on an announcement to enter into a partnership to optimize HMMS’ stockless management. Over the last two years, the two organizations have successfully migrated all of the TransForm’s five hospital organizations (LHIN 1 in Southwestern Ontario) into the supply chain processes with HMMS’ hospital owners and affiliates (15 hospitals in LHIN 2). The results are extremely successful yet highlighted some of the chronic issues plaguing Canada’s healthcare supply chain. Key themes for industry improvement will be highlighted (disparate technologies,sub-optimized sourcing strategies (resource, price and outcome variances), operational readiness for necessary change management) along with examples of some of the innovative strategies HMMS and TransForm used to overcome barriers.

 

Toby O'Hara, GM, HMMS

Derek Robertson, Chief Business Development and Supply Chain Officer, Transform Shared Services Organization

 

Concurrent Session 3.7 - Partnering to Create Value in the Healthcare Supply Chain: How PHSA and J&J created win-win solutions in the end-to-end supply chain

FOCUS -- Improvement of end-to-end supply chains between healthcare buyer and seller organizations.

 

PHSA and J&J have reduced costs in their joint supply chain by taking an approach focused on mutually identifying and reducing wastes that will ultimately benefit both organizations. PHSA and J&J have:

 

  • - Identified improvements that enable more effective labour planning and efficiencies
  • - Increased supply chain visibility and predictability
  • - Consolidated transactional volume, and,
  • - Optimized transportation modes

 

The focus is on the supply chains moving product from J&J’s Toronto distribution centre to the province of British Columbia with the prime focus on optimizing operation of PHSA’s Langley, BC fulfillment centre.

 

The initial engagements focused on 3 areas:

 

1. Consolidating replenishment days and deliveries for the primary PHSA distribution centre

2. Making case packaging configurations available to improve handling

3. Optimizing flow of high volume SKUs via the PHSA Fulfillment Centre versus direct to hospital

 

Through the partnership both organizations have seen benefits in logistics and transactional processes in their joint supply chain. Results experienced across the three engagements outlined above are as follows:

 

1. Consolidated ordering and replenishment

  • o 33% reduction in POs placed for stocked SKUs
  • o Decrease in total number of deliveries received/processed by Langley Fulfillment Centre
  • o Consolidation of transportation volumes to enable more efficient transit modes – Change from 50/50 LTL-Courier split to > 80 / 20 LTL-Courier split

 

2. Improved packaging configuration for high volume SKUs

  • o 25% of unit volume for high volume product category made available in case configurations to improve handling efficiency
  • o Decrease in J&J and PHSA receipt and put-away times
  •  

3. Channel optimization and volume-based product flow

  • o Reconfiguration of over 30 SKUs to higher volume distribution channel
  • o Reduction in over $2,500 of annual minimum order fees


These channel improvements have also benefited downstream customers in BC hospitals that are serviced by the Langley Fulfillment Centre. Costs have been improved for these hospitals as a result of reduced order fees and more efficient flow of product. Channel optimization enables hospital-based logistics activities to be consolidated and reduces the need for clinicians to intervene in these supply chain processes allowing them to spend more time where they are needed – with the patient. 

 

Grant Hunt, Provincial Director, Warehouse and Logistics , Provincial Health Services Authority

Bob Rowe, Manager, Supply Chain Customer Solutions , Warehouse and Logistics , Johnson & Johnson Customer & Logistics Services 

 

Concurrent Session 3.8 - Session title TBD

 

Nancy Sikich, Director of Health Technology Assessment, Health Quality Ontario

IGNITE

Join us for HSCN's 3rd annual Ignite session, where we will take you on a journey through some of the world's most disruptive and important technologies and the impacts that they will have on our healthcare system and supply chain. HSCN Ignite brings together a diverse and incredibly talented lineup of leaders to stimulate new ideas, present innovative solutions to common challenges, and inspire conversation - in 7 minutes or less! Get ready for a high-octane session that will leave you wanting to learn more. Moderated by Sarah Friesen (Friesen Concepts) and Joshua Belinko (Acklands Grainger Inc.).

 

Sarah Friesen, President, Friesen Concepts

Joshua Belinko, Director of Sales, Government and Public Services, Acklands-Grainger Inc.